Archive for the 'Life' Category
Ex Pats Briefed For Brexit, Deal Or No Deal

Alarmist headlines, resignations, and rumours had further stirred the Brexit pot since the last Tenerife presentation from the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, 11 months ago. On Thursday 12th September 2019, around 130 people packed into the Los Cristianos Cultural Centre to her the latest news and advice from Tim Hemmings, Deputy Head of Mission to Spain.

An opening 15 minute update, included a reinstatement of the “unwavering” intent of Spain and the UK to uphold the citizens rights of both countries, and further assurances in the most recent Spanish Royal Decree. Tim Hemmings underlined the fact that both countries had made plans in the cases of a Deal or No Deal departure, and these would preserve the rights of those legally registered in Spain on the Padron as residents. A show of hands revealed that pretty much the whole audience was legally registered, some fairly recently.
No Deal would still leave a 21 month grace period for people to register and become fully legal, for documents such as driving licences to be changed to non EU status. We were also told that the newer certificate form of residencia would most likely revert to the popular card format with a holders photo. Health cover was another key issue with the aim still being that British and Spanish would continue to be treated if living in the other country, but confirmation is still awaited.
Passports would not undergo any instant changes, but it was stressed that checking the expiry date is a good idea to see yours has between 9 years and 6 months coverage. Deputy Hemmings also insisted there would be no need to cover, alter, or remove the EU heading on a current passport. The format of further replacement passports is still to be confirmed.

UK driving licnces would still need to be changed to Spanish licences but could be changed back in the holder then returned to the UK. The recent announcement that UK state pensions for those resident in Spain would be increased up to 2023, was just a short term admin guide, further increases beyond that date would still be approved for a few years at a time. That dealt with the main big areas of concern so at that point questions were invited from the floor, with British Vice Consulate Helen Diaz de Arcaya Keating, Charmaine Arbouin (British Consul for Andalucia and the Canary Islands) , and the Consul´s Brexit Officer Deepika Harjani adding their points of experience and advice to the answers. It’s worth stressing at this point that many answers and links to online forms needed are on the social media sites that the British Consulate host. I’ve included as many direct links as possible but you can find many others, and more detailed information at the websites.
A recent caller at the Playa de Las Americas police station to sort out residencia was told there are no appointments available for now. The team pointed out that there should be under the 21 months grace period, but there is an online appointment booking service. If this still doesn’t work it’s worth contacting the British Consulate to ensure these channels are working in all municipalities.
Swallows (mainly pension age winter visitors) time limits to stay in Spain were queried. The answer was they can stay for 90 days in each 180 day period and it will remain that way under a No Deal withdrawal.
Also the continuation of the S9 health form for free treatment in Spain was queried. No change on this.
Onward free movement within the EU once a Spanish resident is back in the UK. Another area that has yet to be agreed for when we become “third country nationals” after Brexit.
There seemed to be less queries than at previous consulate road shows, it was pointed out the the Swallows don’t tend to start arriving for another month or so. But hopefully the hour length of the meeting was a sign that the many avenues of information publicised by the British Consulate team are working well. They answered several one on one queries after the main meeting broke up, a big thanks to Tim Hemmings and the British Consulate team.

Here are some useful links for more information. The British Consulate site for Tenerife. includes special Brexit area. You can also stay in touch with updates from the British Consolate at Facebook  Check Passport ,Healthcare .

 

Arona En Colores Puts Las Galletas Streets Ahead

They really cast their nets wide in Las Galletas. The fishing village on the other side of Guaza mountain from Los Cristianos played host to tradition and technology, spectacle and sport, and music and monsters as they welcomed the annual Arona En Colores fiesta to the south of Tenerife.

Stages were popping up where the narrow street corners met, and by the large, modern, urban park, and all ages were catered for. Break dancing was the focal point of La Rambla, just behind the pebble beach promenade, just one part of youth expression that also included judo, art, and electronic sports in other streets. Tradition was looked after with a photo exhibition of the fishing history of the area, 21 bronze plaques embedded in the floor of Paseo de los Pescadores ensure the leading families of the trade are forever honoured.

For a rather uncomfortable view of the world there was a 180 degree tumble in a car, great to encourage traffic safety awareness and in car safety features, but best not tried after generous portions of tapas and beer. Live theatre stirred the emotions in a different way as The Lion King roared onto the biggest stage in town. Young children, and young at heart parents, were entranced by the familiar songs, but the nippers could have done with a slightly lower stage surround to see the action without a lift up from the adults. There was more musical influenced muscle stretching in the sports hall for a roller dancing competition. My last venture into the Pabellon Deportes was for a roller hockey match, this was more serene and attracted full tiered seating down the whole of one side of the hall.

Back in the criss cross hub of the pedestrian shopping area, my eye was caught by Lilies Garden Tearoom. There was an Alice In Wonderland theme going on, the famous book was written by an Oxford academic, and it took my mind back to my childhood. There was no need to gaze Through The Looking Glass to get the full effect of the scaley monster towering over me around the next corner. As the street wide inflatable bar football pitch, and bouncy castles pressed against the walls of another side turn, bigger boys were admiring rows of powerful motor bikes from classic names like Porsche, BMW, Harley, and many more.


Even seated outside the Marazul for a meal, there was plenty to watch. A magician, and a strong man couldn’t erase the smiles from their female partners, even when perpetrating dastardly deeds on them. And size really didn’t matter for a stunning performance. A petite young lady placed a pink rose at the edge of a coffee table sized stage she was stood on and then doubled up backwards to pick up the flower in her mouth. Puppets, and wheels of fortune were also enticing people to stop and interact with street performers.

As darkness crept in, music wafted through the air from all corners. The crowds were getting bigger as the night time crowd poured in to swell the walkways and the tills. No Tenerife fiesta would be complete without a carnaval troup of dancers, the white clad ladies obliged, sweeping through all the streets with an eager following of disciples. It was another big winner, and a great sampler for those who had not made the short trip to this vibrant and diverse area.

Parades Swishy And Fishy As Arona Closes The Book On Jungle

Wriggling into tight costumes as AC/DC gave the passing seagulls a full rock blast. It wasn´t a Highway To Hell, just the back road between the beach and Guaza Mountain, and it was filling up with feathers and sequins as the floats loaded up for the Coso Parade up into the centre of Los Cristianos. The 2019 Arona Carnaval was into the final stages but was going out in Tenerife style.

Pride of place went to the candidates and winners in the Queen categories, their huge designs stood like colourful monuments on flat back trucks, awaiting the insertion of their wearers in the centre. Rebeca Gonzalez Cabrera milked the adoration in her pink and silver explosion that scooped the main Carnaval Queen award. Candelaria Perez Dominguez glowed in a cool white dress surrounded by roses, she was number one in the Third Age category.

The starting grid might have looked colourful but chaotic, the stewards had it all sorted and ticked down their clipboards, slowly adding everyone to the mix. It is always a hot, sunny afternoon for the Coso, planning is essential, a good ice box for beer and wine helped the mood along, and an extra lick of make up ensured plenty of happy photos. In keeping with tradition, the parade started an hour later than advertised and snaked its way along the route in bright sunshine.

Official figures said 15,000 people lined the course but it looked less than other years, the tell tale sign was areas of bare rope on each side of the street. Normally it’s almost impossible to squeeze between people all the way along. The revellers, floats, and groups were certainly as plentiful as ever, and the operation was slick, loud, and proud. Even the clean up behind the rear of the parade had a new zest, Arona’s new fleet of Italian, electric, road sweeping buggies ploughed through the rubbish generated by the event.

Alas the final act arrived with the sardine funeral, and what a cutie it looked, but this fish had a sting in the tail. The mourners gathered in their black, widows veils and the procession set off round the streets with much weeping and wailing from the mourners. As tradition demands, I adjourned to The Devon Arms for a couple of Dorada’s as the sardine made its slow progress, emerging just in time to see the fish loom into view at the old beach. As people poured down onto the sand for the cremation, the heavens opened and the rain poured down – the sardines revenge? Slightly soggy, the fish still burst into flames as fireworks ripped through the sky. The monsoon continued, I managed to wade up through town and sought refuge in The Buccaneer as I raised a few glasses to another fabulous Arona Carnaval.

Putting On Their Saturday Best For Arona Carnaval

No school, no college, and no work, Saturday is a great time to throw off any inhibitions you have, and the two daytime Carnaval specials in Los Cristianos were a real family treat. The first week it was the Wig Party, and the second was a music and dance bonanza, both kicking off at noon.

The devotion, humour, and wow factor were evident throughout. The Arona Carnaval theme was Jungle but it was mixed with lots of old favourites, and recycling. There was an element of competition at both the Wig Party and the fancy dress competition at the Plaza del Pescadora, near the beach, on the second week. Prize money was given but in my eyes everyone was a winner, some deserved a prize for being able to dance whilst wearing high heels, heavy cloaks and jackets, and make up that must have made the world look like a blur.

Security gets a bit higher each year as organisers try to stem the flow of over enthusiastic young drinkers, but they try to be discreet and not squash the fun out of the revellers. Another welcome addition this year was a small violet coloured kiosk that ladies could head for if they felt vulnerable.Hopefully they didn’t have many takers, the mood of the Carnaval party is always friendly, and the crowd is a mix of locals, ex pats, and holiday makers. It’s quite an eye opener for newcomers, especially some of the cheekier outfits.

The main stage in the show ground was booming out dance music into the wee hours, and two smaller stages near the cultural centre featured DJ’s and more specialist grooves. A large fun fair offered thrills just across the road, and a large variety of food and drink stalls catered for every need. Walking along the beach promenade late on the Saturday evening, the celebrations were overflowing to surrounding bars and the sand. Parking is always challenging but at least the old spare land behind the Valdes Centre was back in free use this year.

The weather teased this year with sudden localised downpours nearby but the heart of the Carnaval led a charmed life and was bathed in sunshine. One of my highlights was seeing two large orange dinosaurs waddling in time to the music – and that was before I had started on the Dorada!

Welcome To The Jungle At Arona Carnaval

Like a modern day Tarzan, I´m going to swing in and defend the honour of the Cabalgata, the opening parade of the annual Arona Carnaval. Many visitors to the south of Tenerife ask when is the Los Cristianos Carnaval? meaning the Sunday Coso closing parade from the foot of Guaza Mountain to the city centre. Arona municipality covers part of Playa de Las Americas as well as Los Cristianos, so they like to spread the love by having the opening parade from Veronicas to the Oasis Commercial Centre just before Las Vistas beach. With this years jungle theme vaguely in mind, 2019 brought another wonderful evening of colour, music, and laughter.

Coaches spilled their cargo of eager, young revellers with mountains of latex suits, feathers, and make up, and as the sun set, the frantic army squeezed into their weird and wonderful costumes. The main difference to the closing parade is the Queen, plus senior and junior versions have not yet been elected, so the public get a clear view of the candidates in open top cars, long before they are encased in their extravagant royal costumes. There is also more of an end of term feel to the Coso with many strange regular characters from history and cartoons. But the Cabalgata certainly isn’t shy, they were chomping at the bit to strut their stuff, and everyone was decked out from head to toe.

The cool of the evening is a marked contrast to the heat of the Sunday afternoon closing event, just right for those clad in heavy outfits. Big respect to the leaders of the groups, make up needed applying, emergency repairs cropped up, and fitting their charges into their allocated staring slots required planning, precision, and the odd ciggie or beer. The gathering area is right next to a strip of bars, everyone wanted a photo with the glittering stars, and their requests were met with smiles and a snazzy pose. When the drum beats started to sound, the tempo picked up and the seemingly rag tag bands of marchers formed a seamless sea of joy.

The turn out this year along the route was as busy as ever. Hotel lobbies emptied onto the street, meals were put on hold as photos were snapped, and every vantage point was used to the full. The journey took a good 90 minutes, everyone wanted to see the mobile show, it was like lighting the blue touch paper on this years Carnaval. Hold on tight, it´s a jungle out there!

Chill Wind Blows Some Good Memories On Icy Oxford Visit

Like the snow that was heading across the UK, I drifted into Oxford for an overdue visit to my roots. It felt plenty cold enough as winters fingers poked and prodded me, but as well as catching up with family and friends, I managed to rub noses with some dark brooding ales, and take some short, bracing walks.

It was crisp and sunny when I wandered down the Oxford canal tow path from Hythe Bridge Street. The grass area was a popular summer sandwich spot when I worked in a nearby George Street Co Op office as a spotty youth, and even though the Nags Head opposite has changed more times than Dr Who, I could almost taste their doorstep hot sausage sarnies. Narrow boats of many years wear lined the canal bank, many paying for long term moorings. Plump ducks waddled along the grass bank, watched closely by a large friendly cat that hopped from boat to boat with ease – maybe an undercover sea dog? I just wandered as far as the lock and bridge, and many other people were taking a stroll too. I made a mental note to do the full hour plus walk to Wolvercote on my summer visit, several delightful pubs en route will keep me cool.

Oxford keeps changing, not always for the good, lots of my favourite old pubs have gone, so it was nice to visit a revived ancient coaching inn, The Plough at 38 (to use the full new title), in Cornmarket Street. It had been Austin Reed tailors for as long as I could remember but the ground floor is now a bar with home brew ale to come, and the gutted upstairs is becoming a restaurant with a chef who trained under Heston Blumenthal at The Fat Duck. It’s just around the corner from my old haunt, The Three Goats Heads, which is a pale shadow of its old self. The Chequers in High Street was an early watering hole of mine and remains largely unchanged, they helped me to sign off my last night in style with a 6.5 % Broken Dream. It fortified me for the sideways wave of snow that was blasting along the High Street as I left.

Rewinding to earlier in the day, the harsh frost added a white coating to my stroll down from Headington, past the haunting spectre of South Park, where I was tortured by knee deep mud, and flying snowballs on cross country runs from Cheney School. Crossing over I walked through Headington Hill park with its trail of magnificent oaks, pines, squirrels, and robins. The path took me out to Marston Road, I had a brief but mind numbing career with the civil service there, all the buildings have now been swept away for Brookes University’s endless student housing blocks. Over the road and down past the forlorn and deserted Somerset pub, put me on the path into the University Parks. Hedges and trees were a brittle white, and the small brook was glazed over with ice. As I stood on the bridge just before the main park entrance, ducks and geese were bravely taking to the river, and swans swooped majestically to land near their huge nests along the banks.


The Parks were busy with joggers and dog walkers, I found it strange to see the cricket pitch looking as white as an umpires freshly washed flannels. Many a happy hour was passed by myself and friends when the touring international sides played the Combined Universities. We would book the three days off work, load up the cool boxes with beer, and relax in the sun to the soundtrack of willow on leather. I regretted not booking the extra Saturday for my trip, a chance to see Oxford City FC at home. Then the snow came, guaranteeing that match was called off anyway. So the weather was part curse, and part blessing, there’s a special harsh beauty to an English winter, and it is always nice to embrace my home city.

Kings Aint What They Used To Be

Less of a touch down and more of a let down. That was the arrival of the Three Kings in Los Cristianos for Reyes Eve, 5th January. For the first time it was announced that they would arrive at the Cultural Centre by helicopter, a method used for many years by Santa Cruz, and Adeje, with their football grounds as the destination. An expectant crowd were drawn like a magnet for the 6 pm arrival. The Helidreams helicopter circled twice, the second time it flew on over the roof and into the distance, just as a spotlight picked out the waving kings on the centre’s rooftop balcony. They might as well have said they were on board a passing tourist plane heading into the south airport.

However, the other changes to the evening’s programme were much better received. The host at the Cultural Centre did her best to build the excitement among the estimated 20,000 fans who were focused on the stage and giant screen. Grabbing the waiting camels, Gaspar, Melchor, and Baltasar led the parade towards and around the church plaza, and along Avenida de Suecia. This was the opposite direction to previous years and allowed Arona council’s hard working staff to dismantle the stage and crowd barriers near the main crossroads of town, and to get the traffic flowing again. Cartoon and comic characters (Disney and Marvel) dominated but there were plenty of lovingly created costumes, and the happy sound of music. Sweets cascaded down as the kings showered their followers, balconies and upper windows were packed.

The end destination this year was a stage outside the Casa del Mar, in the open area between the old beach and the tunnel to Las Vistas beach. Thankfully the chilly gusting wind subsided so the long queues could snake their way through to each of the kings as the lucky children were called up to receive their presents. Several shops in the run up to Reyes offer a service to have gifts wrapped and added to the lockers of the kings to delight the children on the night. Normally these presentations would take place on the steps of the Cultural Centre, the new site seemed more exclusive to those involved, without curious passers by.

There´s no diluting the joy and excitement on the faces of children and parents as they unwrap their big night of the year. It was good that they tried something different to shake things up this year, maybe next time the helicopter will land, even if it´s nearby and relayed on the big screen. The earlier start will have been greatly appreciated by parents, and the boom in trade around local bars and restaurants had the tills singing a merry tune.

Brits Go Crackers For Christmas On Tenerife Beach

At Blackpool they would have turned blue, at Torquay their teeth would have chattered, and at Skegness their skin would have been covered in goose bumps, but in Tenerife there was a morning rush to Los Cristianos beach to celebrate Christmas Day in a very British fashion.

It was hot and sunny, whoa before you envy us too much, the previous day had been plagued by a calima, and dust from the Sahara was still hanging in the air. Oh yes we do suffer a bit, well not that much, but we were free of sprouts and up to our armpits in sausage rolls, mince pies, and yummy cakes. Converging on the beach is a tradition started by “swallows” the affectionate term for the elderly Brits who fly south to Tenerife each winter to escape the cold. In recent years other age groups and nationalities have embraced the custom, there were well over 100 setting up small tables and chairs along the quayside wall and down on the sand.

Wine, Cava, and fizzy plonk corks popped as paper plates and napkins were handed out. It´s all very organised and the costumes get more bizarre and extravagant every year. Sun worshippers and sea bathers flocked across the beach to see what all the commotion was about, and many stayed to join in the fun. Suitably watered, it was time to strike up the Christmas carols, song sheets had of course been printed out and distributed. The show stopper is always the long drawn out rendition of The Twelve Days Of Christmas, complete with smaller groups surging forward to illustrate their chosen day, the choreography is worthy of Strictly Come Dancing.


Seagulls were taking detours to swoop over and have a look, a helicopter sweeping the skies came back for several takes, and the ferry boats serving the other Canary Islands, tooted their approval. It´s always a great chance to catch up with people and to appreciate the beauty and diversity of Tenerife life. As time ticked over into early afternoon, people started to melt away to pre arranged meals with family and friends. All very impressive but you should see what happens on the same stretch of coast for New Years Eve…

Walk For Life Has A 5,000 Watt Pink Pulse

Take a great cause like the fight against breast cancer, add an army of dedicated followers, and unleash it on the streets of south Tenerife. That´s what happens when the annual Walk For Life (Carrera Por La Vida) links Arona and Adeje, the 2018 vintage was sweeter than ever and attracted a record 5,000 walkers that raised a staggering 35,500 euros.

This years start point was the Golden Mile near Los Cristianos, it was buzzing even an hour before the set off time. Pink is always the colour of choice, and it burst forth in t-shirts, hats, beards, wigs, and make up. As breast cancer touches so many lives, the walk always attracts a wide cross section of nationalities, ages, and even pets are called into service. Many new comers are surprised at what a joyous event it is, hope is the big theme, early diagnosis and medical advances ensure that breast cancer doesn´t have to be a death sentence. Those who have lost loved ones walk as a tribute to those who didn´t survive, and also as a defiant assertion that cancer will be tamed.

Just entering the gathering point is uplifting, so many friends, so much caring, and so much love. Music helps to pump up the walkers, the stage featured Tenerife singer Agoney, and dance teams to lead a grand bop to loosen up those leg muscles. Canarian drum groups laid down the beat as the pink procession weaved its way through to Playa de Las Americas past the bars and restaurants. Looking back it was difficult to see where the pink ribbon ended, holiday makers were caught up in the spectacle and donated to the growing funds. Organiser Brigitte Gypen led from the front with the mayors of Arona and Adeje also in the vanguard.

It took just over an hour to reach the finish point at Plaza Salytien and even then it was a long time before the rear guard caught up with the early arrivals. More music, bananas, water, and snacks, provided by sponsors helped to replenish the batteries of the eager army. It´s hard to think of any movement that has made such a big impact on the south of Tenerife, and it looks set to keep growing each year. In terms of raising awareness, it can´t be ignored, in terms of raising funds, it can´t be beaten, and in terms of offering help and hope, it can´t be equalled. Big thanks to everyone who played their part – see you next year.

Tenerife Remembers

Even more poignant on the 100th anniversary of the end of the first world war, there were millions of reasons to reflect and give thanks to those who gave their lives for a better world. Tenerife may be a far flung holiday fun spot but ex pats and tourists joined together on Sunday 11th November for the annual remembrance day services.

I ventured to Costa del Silencio for their outdoor service around the swimming pool of the Westhaven Bay complex. Medals shone in the bright sun but many of the faces echoed the dark memories of loss and suffering within their families. The comforting and financially supportive arm of the Royal British Legion embraces all outposts, and offers support and nurture to servicemen, servicewomen, and their families affected by all conflicts. Church services took place at six other venues across the south west of Tenerife but Costa del Silencio offers a unique setting, its view out to sea acting as a window to a wider and more turbulent world. Many people wore not just medals relating to their own service in recent conflicts, but also inherited medals from family no longer with us.

Wreaths were laid at the table and makeshift altar as several hundred people rose to sing the first of the hymns, lessons were read out by veterans, it was an emotional and testing time for them but there was no shortage of friends to encourage them along. It was noticeable that many younger people and a few children were in attendance, warnings unheeded and lessons learnt need to be shared with the next generation. I consider myself so lucky not to have been called upon to defend my privileged life, my grandad told me about a few of the horrors of WW1 but I wish I had asked him about more of his memories.

In keeping with the Tenerife setting, the British Vice Consul, Helen Diaz de Arcaya Keating, read the act of commitment in Spanish. More prayers and hymns, including Abide With Me, followed, and the act of remembrance reached down into many memories and many souls. “They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we will remember them.”
This was followed by the last post, and an immaculate silence. One of the beauties of the setting is the closeness to the sea. A small pathway led down the cliff to a ledge where a wreath of poppies was cast onto the sea and joined by small wooden crosses thrown into the tide. It was a wonderful service to mark a special day, however the good work of the Royal British Legion goes on throughout the year. We have a lot to be grateful for.