Archive for September, 2021
Reaping A Harvest Of History At El Tanque Eco Museum

Teno rural park, the pools, caves, and peaks of Erjos, and the last big volcanic eruption site at Chinyero. They are all linked by popular walking trails, but dig deeper into the soil of this north western corner of Tenerife and a common bond is revealed. A trip to the El Tanque Eco Museo will show how a special bond between nature and people was forged by hard work and respect.

Nestling between a pine forest and and view to the distant ocean, a huddle of renovated 17th century farm buildings with courtyards, threshing circles, and even spme small caves to shelter goats, have plenty of tales to tell. An ancient plough stands proud on the roundabout by the entrance ro the museum, just above the Los Llanos turning where Santiago del Teide blends into Erjos. A short walk up from the Titsa bus stop by Bar Fleyta or a drive to the ample car parking of the museum is all that´s needed.

Inside the FREE museum, old rural tools are complimented by interactive display screens in English, Spanish, and Germman, with GR codes ready to give phone access to personal testimonies from people who have worked the volcanic enriched soil. There´s even solar panels to save energy – very ancient meets modern.

There were no such short cuts in the past, seasons were long and hard with ground being broken, fertilised and seeded before a range of cereals and potatoes could be grown. Threshing was also a long process of around six weeks with cereal crops dried in the sun and then raked over by a threshing board pulled by oxen or horses. Whole families would take part, it was a big social event with songs, stories, and meals shared as they worked. Every year a threshing fair still takes place in the last week of July to preserve and celebrate yhose traditions.

Large picnic areas now encourage visitors to linger on their visit. The museum is open every day except Monday, from 1st June to 30 September from 11 am to 6 pm, and from 1st October to 31st May – 10.30 am to 5.30 pm. The museum can arrange group visits and tours, just contact them via the website. Whether your rural knowledge is a seedling or fully grown, the museum will make you feel closer to nature.

New Boys Bring Goal Joys For CD Tenerife

Confidence oozed through CD Tenerife as transfer window signings flicked the on switch for a convincing 2-0 home win over Segunda Division leaders Ponferradina.

Elady, and Enric Gallego were big and bustling up front sewing seeds of doubt in the visitors defence and providing clear targets for their team mates to pick out. Elady was denied twice in early play by the Ponferradina goalie and when the away side made it to the hosts end, goalie Soriano, another summer arrival,was in solid form to seize the ball. It wasn´t just about the new faces, Tenerife held on to last seasons gems despite envious eyes from other clubs, it made for an encouraging blend of the defensive discipline installed last season by coach Ramis, and a bold new belief.

Sam Shashoua laid off some tempting balls for the front two and full back Alex Muñoz used the left flank as his own personal playground. Veteran centre back Carlos Ruiz had a cheeky claim for a penalty when bundled over but the ref didn´t oblige. Ponferrasina faded fast and offered little, half time was reached with no goals but that looked sure to be temporary as Tenerife were calling the tune.

The arrival of deadline day recruit Mollejo, a 20 year old loanee from Atletico Madrid, added to the attacking vibe. Lively and hungry for the ball, the new boy showed creativity and within five minutes Elady had grabbed the lead, pouncing on a poor clearance before placing it wide of the goalies reach. Coach Ramis kept up the tempo by adding local striker Ethyan for Enric who departed to generous applause from the 6,940 Covid limited crowd. Masked fans were not deterred by the vlistering heat and belted out the much missed terrace anthems.

The best was yet to come. Defender Alex Muñoz doesn´t score many goals but they are usually spectacular. This time he latched onto a through ball, waltzed through three defenders and unleashed a fierce shot into the Ponferradina net. The clincher was watched from the visitors bench by Naranjo, subbed for being as ineffective as he was during two seasons with Tenerife. There is a lot more to come from the resurgent Tenerife squad, they played with a dash of style and plenty of heart. Tougher challenges lie ahead but the squad has lots of positional options and competiton for places in the starting eleven.

 

Shining A Light On Malpais De La Rasca

Candy striped and 167 feet tall, the most modern of two lighthouses can be seen from Los Cristianos beach in the south of Tenerife. Answering its call with two friends, we uncovered the harsh but beautiful coastal history of lava fields, salt production, and moody seas. Malpais de la Rasca is the protected cultural heritage site but we started out at the fishing village of Las Galletas. Freak waves had punched a gaping hole in the beach promenade, a reminder that this stretch of twinkling blue sea could pack a punch anytime it chose to. The modern marina soon faded as small coves and crunching shingle led us through tall spikey cardones plants. Rock pools abounded as a meandering path climbed and dipped. Shade arrived alongside huge plantations of bananas that looked enough to feed an army of monkeys.

A notice and the rearing tower of the 1978 built lighthouse announced the entrance to the malpais (badlands). Dried pools harked back to the days when sea salt was harvested from the waves that buffeted the coast. There were other welcome uses for these small puddles of water. Tabaiba plants sprout in clusters around the lava field, the toxic armaga variety sprinkled in a pool would induce a drunk like state making the delirious fush easy to grab.

The squat buildings near the sea beacon are from the 1898 original lighthouse, built from stone quarried from Guaza mountain were for the lighthouse keepers family, and the lamp room which needed lighting by hand from acetylene gas. There was no such burden  on our visit, just a few young sun bathers on the nearby outcrops of rock, oblivious to the daily dramas that used to play out as ships were kept well away from the rocks.

Pushing on into the lava fields, we followed an uneven surface a few yards back from the sea. It must have been a slow and uncomfortable procession for herders, cattle, and traders. Some of the old stone huts (goros) still remain at least in part, they would have provided welcome relief from unexpected turns in the weather and any accidents on slippy surfaces. In recent years people have built illegal shacks on the protected zone, a few weeks before our visit a big clean up removed 1,335 kilos of rubbish. that doesn´t mean it´s lifeless out there, some 40 species of reptile call the area home.

Guaza mountain and the modern developments of Palm Mar steered us past the old protective fort and onto even roads to a small promenade. Familiar landmarks over in Los Cristianos looked enticingly close but its a choice of a steep up and over the mountain or our chosen route up the main street of Palm Mar to the busy bus road back into Los Cristianos. The mountain is worthy of a dedicated walk in its own right with a track up the spine to the radio mast park at the peak. A few bars in Palm Mar ensured we cot some cooling liquids after a hot 2.5 hour stroll. Rasca is a taste of tradition and a connection to tougher times.